Ray Allen Calls Post-Game Interviews "Therapeutic," Secures His Place As Media's DarlingS

Every morning, the fine folks at Sports Radio Interviews sift through the a.m. drive-time chatter to bring you the best interviews with coaches, players, and personalities across the sports landscape. Today: Ray Allen reveals that he is abnormal and looks forward to post-game interviews.

Allen joined WEEI in Boston to talk about Boston's Tuesday night win against the 76ers and how it never hurts to beat a playoff-caliber team at this time of year, his thoughts on the state of the team's chemistry since the trading deadline, if the team is as frustrated with one another as they seem to have been at times during their recent struggles, and to share a PG version of a story about Jim Calhoun taking the '99 UCONN Huskies to a barn down in Kentucky prior to the start of the NCAA Tournament.

On the chemistry level inside the Celtics locker room recently:
"I think everybody is just trying to make sure they're doing their job the way they're supposed to. The old guys, we're trying to figure out or make sure we accept the new guys. And the new guys are trying to make sure that they're learning what they need to do and do it every single day. So that's the chemistry, and every year you learn that in training camp. We have some intelligent guys coming in so we know that they're doing what they can to get better."

If the Celtics are as frustrated with one another as they seem to be at times from the outside looking in:
"I don't think we get frustrated with one another, sometimes you just don't have the answers immediately after a game. For me personally, talking to the media is very therapeutic because it helps figure out some of the things that you need to continue to do out on the floor that you didn't do, and you can just get things off your chest... We're a communicating group of guys that whether we're on the road on the plane after a loss, or we're at home in the locker room after a loss, we talk about it, we talk about things we can do better. And never do we look at each other and get frustrated. This is probably one of the best group of guys that I've ever been around in doing that."

On how important it is for a shooter like him to establish a rhythm earlier on in games:
"Yeah it is important. As a shooter/scorer, you've got to develop a rhythm early whether it's getting to the free throw line, having the ball in your hands, getting an easy layup, a easy pop shot. Those are important because it builds a rhythm, and it builds an offensive rhythm for your team going throughout games getting some easy plays."

If he'd care to share a story about Jim Calhoun taking his UCONN trip on a field trip prior to the start of the 1999 NCAA Tournament:
"[W]e were playing at Rupp Arena, that was my junior year. It was like ‘get ‘em out of the hotel, I don't want them sitting around.' He always did something. Now I understand it more, because now I travel and I get out and I do certain things just to enjoy certain cities. So he took us to a horse farm in Kentucky, and he was like, ‘guys, you think you guys are doing something?' And then we walked into this barn, and this big horse came out, and he was just ready. He was ready. He just saddled this thing and he just went to work. And we were like ‘wow!' Everybody was going crazy, everybody was laughing, it was so funny, and we were like ‘we really ain't doing nothing.' That was the PG version."

This post, written by Michael Bean, appears courtesy of Sports Radio Interviews. For the complete highlights of the interview, as well as audio, click here.

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