Report: A-Rod, Gio Gonzalez, Nelson Cruz, Melky Cabrera, Others Named In Records Of Miami PED Dealer

Set aside some time to read Tim Elfrink's bombshell story in the Miami New Times, on what can only be termed BALCO East: a Miami "anti-aging clinic" that specializes in HGH, synthetic testosterone, and any other performance-enhancing drug you can imagine. We know this because the clinic's director helpfully kept handwritten records of his clients and their regimens.

The clinic is called Biogenesis, and its head is Anthony Bosch, who is proof you don't need to be a criminal mastermind to run a massive PED ring—he had aliases for each of his clients, but when writing down their appointments and prescriptions, included both the nickname and their real name. There's known PED users Alex Rodrigez, Melky Cabrera, Bartolo Colon, and Padres super-rookie Yasmani Grandal; previously unimplicated baseball players Nelson Cruz and Gio Gonzalez; Cuban boxer Yuriorkis Gamboa; South African tennis player Wayne Odesnik.

Bosch was almost comically inept—in one of his notebooks, he had written glowing praise of himself, like a middle-schooler on a Trapper Keeper:

"Dr. Tony Bosch is recognized as an international educator and world-class leader in bio-identical hormone replacement therapy," reads one description, which also praises him as a "pioneer in orthomolecular medicine" and calls him a "molecular biochemist."

It was Bosch and his father, Pedro Bosch, who reportedly provided Manny Ramirez with the hormone hCG that led to his suspension in 2009.

Alex Rodriguez, who maintains he stopped using PEDs a decade ago, is all over Bosch's records. One patient list, from 2009, lists Rodriguez, noting he paid $3,500 for "1.5/1.5 HGH (sports perf.) creams test., glut., MIC, supplement, sports perf. Diet."

The mentions of Rodriguez begin in 2009 and continue all the way through last season. Take a page in another notebook, which is labeled "2012" and looks to have been written last spring. Under the heading "A-Rod/Cacique," Bosch writes, "He is paid through April 30th. He will owe May 1 $4,000... I need to see him between April 13-19, deliver troches, pink cream, and... May meds. Has three weeks of Sub-Q (as of April)."

Elsewhere in his notebooks, Bosch writes that "Sub-Q" refers to his mixture of HGH, IGF-1, and other drugs.

The notebooks and client lists aren't the only evidence linking Rodriguez to Bosch. Former employees say Bosch would openly brag about selling drugs to Rodriguez.

"He was always talking about A-Rod," says one former employee who asked not to be named. "We never saw any athletes in the office, so we didn't know if he was just talking bullshit or not. But he would brag about how tight they were."

Melky Cabrera, who was busted in the middle of an MVP-type season for failing a drug test, seems to have infuriated Bosch.

Bosch rails against Cabrera, writing that "in helping him, I put my business and all my doctors at risk by fabricating patient charts and phony prescriptions." He adds that the slugger should "man-up" and pay $9,000 he owes, adding, "I am on the 'line' here!!"

Nelson Cruz is listed as taking "troches," a synthetic testosterone lozenge. Gio Gonzalez appears multiple times, with one of his notations reading, "Zinc/MIC/... and Aminorip. For Gio and charge $1,000."

When New Times approached the players and teams with these allegations last week, certain players' agents began leaking information to lay the blame on Bosch, and soften the blow of this scoop. On Saturday, both the New York Daily News and ESPN.com ran stories indicating MLB was investigating Bosch, as well as the entire South Florida "PED Corridor."

MLB says it will look into these latest allegations.

A Miami Clinic Supplies Drugs to Sports Biggest Names [Miami New Times]