On Friday, Joe Mixon’s attorneys released video of the Oklahoma RB punching out Amelia Molitor, and the timing wasn’t accidental. The State Supreme Court had ruled that it must be made public, though not when, so Mixon’s attorneys pulled the classic Friday evening news dump in an attempt to bury it. (Coincidentally, Molitor graduated from OU on Friday night.)

Today, the Oklahoman has obtained and published Mixon’s interview with Norman police on July 28, 2014, three days after the assault. In the hourlong video, Mixon tells detectives that Molitor was the aggressor.

[T]he girl, she dropped her purse, that’s when she came in my face, pushed me, and then my glasses came off, and then, like, I had, like, jumped at her, like, to watch out. And then she came in my face. I put my head down. And she swung on me.

“And after that, like, I was so shocked, because she hit me so hard. It felt like a dude hit me. And after that, like, my face went boom, my reaction was just right there.”

Later in the interview, Mixon again told detectives his punch, which fractured bones in Molitor’s face, was an instinctive reaction to being slapped.

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“I mean, even though she pushed me, I didn’t think she was going to hit me,” Mixon said, repeating what he said earlier in the interview. “I was so shocked, because she hit me so hard, it felt like, really, like a dude hit me. And then, like, my face just started ringing. And after that, like, it was just like a reaction.”

Mixon told detectives that Molitor had intentionally blown cigarette smoke in his face, and he followed her inside the restaurant when she went to speak with Sooners RB David Smith. Mixon then claimed another man with Molitor called him a racial slur, and admitted he responded with a slur on the man’s sexual orientation, and that’s when things started getting physical.

“[T]he girl, I guess she got scared or what, she went up inside, and she went to talk to the person that I came there with [Smith], and I guess she knew him or whatever.

“So when she went inside, she was talking about how we were trying to jump her. So that’s when [Molitor’s friend] went inside, and I followed the dude. That’s when I interrupted her and I was talking to Sooner Dave, talking about how nobody was trying to jump her, we had no problem with her, she was just being disrespectful, you know … smoking in my face and acting crazy.”

[...]

“The gay dude … he called me something. He was like, ‘nigger.’ So then I was like, you got me messed up. And then I called him a ‘fag.’”

Mixon claimed Molitor’s friend used the racial slur to refer to him, but didn’t say it directly to him, but was addressing the other people at the table. In the interview, detectives express disbelief that the man would have used the word at a table that included Smith, who is black.

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The issue of the slur has been at the heart of the backlash against Molitor in the OU community, with the woman receiving abuse and harassment based on the mistaken belief that she used a slur against Mixon. Many media outlets covered the story as if she had. Mixon and his attorneys certainly didn’t go out of their way to disabuse fans of that idea—in court papers, Mixon alleged he heard Molitor “and/or members of her party” use racial slurs.

In the interview, Mixon’s attorneys asked detectives to charge Molitor. They declined. Mixon was charged with misdemeanor assault, and under an Alford plea accepted a sentence of counseling and 100 hours of community service. Oklahoma redshirted Mixon after the assault charge.

Molitor’s civil suit against Mixon is still pending.

[Oklahoman]