Golf Channel analyst and three-time Masters champ Nick Faldo crushed Tiger Woods this morning, claiming Woods made no attempt to obey the rules of golf and that he deserved disqualification—then pleading with Tiger to "do the manly thing" and retire from the tournament.

Faldo pointed to Tiger's own words, in which he admits dropping the ball in a more advantageous location, then to the rules that state explicitly a player must drop the ball "as close as possible" to the original point of play. He then argued for Tiger's resignation:

He should really sit down and think about this and the mark this will leave on his career, his legacy,everything. he should really sit quietly with whoever he trusts, Mark Steinberg, a few others, maybe Lindsey as well, and sit and just go, wow, I would be doing the rule manly thing to go, I have broken the rules of golf.

Look at the players that we've had on tour recently. Brian Davis the most recent one. He's in the hazard, he takes his back swick, he touches a dead reed, the thickness of a straw. It brushes it. He calls the ruling on himself. And that's one of the rules, when every player knows that did not change the lie of the golf ball and did not change the stroke at all. Right? This one has clearly changed the lie of the golf ball, absolutely clearly. and many of us or our careers have called out playing partners, oh, I'm in the rough, I'm taking it back, and the ball is going dunk, moved a quarter of an inch, and we've all called it and said, oh, one shot. OK, mate. And get on with it. We've done this for years, all of us. We've all policed ourselves. That's the most wonderful thing about this game of golf. By the black and white of these rules. It's been around since 1911, usga, and, you know, sometimes the black and white is harsh. But i think Tiger would gain massive brownie points if he stood up and said, you know, you're right, guys, I clearly have broken the rules. And I'll walk, I'll see you next week.

[GOLF]