Advertisement

IndyCar Insiders' Plan To Fix Series' Decline: Do Nothing

At the Indianapolis 500 last weekend, we asked a bunch of IndyCar drivers how they would make the sport more popular. “Produce the same kind of race as always,” driver Ed Carpenter suggested. “The product speaks for itself,” Marco Andretti said. This year’s Indy 500 produced the third-lowest television ratings in 30…

Get Excited For The Indy 500 With Our Photo Gallery Of The Weekend So Far

It’s one of the biggest days in motorsports each year, and the 100th running of the Indianapolis 500 will roll off in just a few hours. It’s not hard to sense the excitement surrounding the whole spectacle, and we’ve got a few folks out there to bring it all to you—from a whole lot closer than your TV will probably…

Use This Chart To Not Look Like A Chump Who Doesn't Know The Difference Between An IndyCar And An F1 Car

As you likely know, the 100th running of the Indy 500 is just about to happen, and that’s a big deal. Even if we all solemnly agree that this centennial is indeed a Big Deal, there’s still many upstanding gearheads who may be confused about the differences between the two best-known open-wheel racing series. Let’s see…

Here's The 'Milk List' For The 100th Running Of The Indy 500 

The Indianapolis 500 doesn’t greet winners with a big bottle of champagne as most races do. They hand the winner an ice cold bottle of milk. This creates a curious artifact every year: a list of driver’s milk preferences. Who wants the whole experience? Who’d rather water it down? Behold! Here’s this year’s list.

James Hinchcliffe Bounces Back From Near-Fatal Injury To Claim Indy 500 Pole

The Verizon IndyCar Series’ James Hinchcliffe might have just pulled off one of the best comebacks in racing. In 2015, Hinchcliffe almost died in an Indianapolis 500 practice crash when a suspension piece went through his leg. This year, he’ll start the Indy 500 on pole position for its landmark 100th running.

Former Weed Kingpin Racer Returns To The Track After 26 Years In Prison

Randy Lanier got his start in grassroots sports car racing and then financed a motorsports career by moving hundreds of thousands of pounds of marijuana. It’s kind of fitting that after nearly three decades in prison, convicted as one of the country’s biggest weed kingpins, that he made his return to racing there too.

Advertisement