As we sort through the public reaction to the possibility of "Game Of Shadows" reporters Mark Fainaru-Wada and Lance Williams heading to jail for their refusal to give up their sources, we have found something surprising: The vast majority of people we talk to about this who aren't reporters think they should absolutely go to jail. This was, to say the least, a shock: In the world of journalism, particularly sports journalism, Fainaru-Wada and Williams are heroes. But many people think they should spend some time in Maurice Clarett's world. And these aren't all angry Giants fans either. Far from it.

So what's the deal? Where's the disparity? The Bleacher Report attempts to state the anti-reporter viewpoint.

In the eyes of the American justice system, there is no difference between the two parties - and that's what makes the American justice system so great. Everyone is treated equally regardless of how much a sleazeball or saint one is thought to be.

Do you really think Jason Giambi would've admitted his usage of steroids if he had known his supposedly sealed testimony would later be leaked to the press? Would Barry Bonds have even copped to the "clear" and the "cream"? If we are ever to get to the bottom of this steroid problem, then we need people to testify, including players that are currently playing in the big leagues. If players believe that whatever they say behind closed doors will be leaked to the press and ultimately the public, they will never testify and we will never really get to the bottom of the problem.

We're not sure we necessarily agree, but yeah: We can at least understand where the sentiment is coming from. It used to be a badge of honor for a reporter to serve prison time to protect their sources. It seems perverse to punish the outstanding journalism of Fainaru-Wada and Williams ... but they wouldn't be the first reporters to go to prison to protect a source, and if they go, they won't be the last.

Memo To BALCO Writers: Don't Drop The Soap [The Bleacher Report]