Sports News Without Access, Favor, Or Discretion

Employers Make Offices Safe For Self-Hatred And Boredom

This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.

Since we haven't been able to get MLB.tv to work in about a week — we're convinced they're purposely screwing with us — we've been spending a lot of time using MLB Gameday of late, which we think is hands-down the best Gametracker of any on the Web. It almost too much information, in fact; our eyes have to look eight or nine different places before we finally get to the part that updates.

Pittsburgh blogger The Ex-Burger wrote a loving post about MLB Gameday last week, pointing out that he loved that he could use the feature at work. "Fortunately, there's Gameday, updating me pitch after pitch as I eschew my daily responsibilities and work hard mostly at being aware enough to minimize the window when my boss walks by, and calm enough not to cheer audibly when the Pirates manage to drive in a run or get out of a tough inning. For three hours, I am blissfully distracted, and I literally am paid to follow the team."

Advertisement

Well, you can probably guess what happened next: "Last Thursday, I was fired by Alured Publishing Corporation, where I had spent six months as the company's Assistant Managing Editor. The company cited my story on this website as the cause, claiming I had used company equipment for my own entertainment, an act punishable by dismissal."

Far be it from us to tell an employer how to run their business; we're sure time spent on MLB Gameday could be far better used in an endless, pointless, demoralizing meeting somewhere. But we'll say this: If every place fired their employees for following sports online, well, everyone we know would be unemployed. Including us.

How MLB.com Got Me Fired [ExBurger]

Share This Story