Photo: Dylan Buell (Getty)

Brewers hurler Adrian Houser got recalled from AAA for just his fifth career MLB appearance, was tapped to pitch the top of the eighth inning, finished his warm-up tosses, and then promptly barfed.

Craig Counsell said a few things went into Houser’s regurgitation, including the heat. (Gametime temperature in Milwaukee was 87, with high humidity.)

“I know he was physically sick but he wasn’t under the weather at all,” said Brewers manager Craig Counsell. “It was an early wake-up call, not enough food, heat, probably a little nerves from getting to the big leagues today. There wasn’t very much coming out — it wasn’t a food thing.”

Houser collected himself, allowed a double, forced a groundout—and then puked again.

Because you were wondering, the Brewers were not charged with a mound visit for either barf.

“I think it was a combination of traveling this morning and not having a lot of food in me. I was trying to stay hydrated in the bullpen. It’s pretty hot here compared to [Triple-A] Colorado Springs. All combined, it got me,” Houser said.

Advertisement

We’ve all been there, man. Houser stayed in the game, gave up an RBI double, then managed to work his way out of the inning.

Brewers fans, who had sat patiently through the pair of vomit delays, chanted “puke and rally!” and they did indeed rally for four runs in the ninth. It wasn’t enough, as Milwaukee fell to the Phillies 10-9. This is a mercy, because if the Brewers had come back to win, the Rally Puke would have become a Rally Squirrel–esque team superstition for the rest of the season, with the team airing puke videos on the jumbotron in key moments to fire up the crowd, and fans buying up adorable plush puke puddles. We all dodged a bullet here.