Sports News Without Fear, Favor or Compromise
Sports News Without Fear, Favor or Compromise

Racist College Coaches Are Getting Exposed by Their Players, and it's Awesome

Penn State coach Pat Chambers told a player, “I want to loosen the noose around your neck,” according to ESPN.
Penn State coach Pat Chambers told a player, “I want to loosen the noose around your neck,” according to ESPN.
Image: Getty

Oklahoma State’s Mike Gundy was just the tip of the iceberg.

One of the benefits from this recent moment of “awakening” and “convenient consciousness” that’s spread across the county the last few months, is that people of color have become more comfortable and empowered to call out the bulls**t they deal with every day. And with the help of social media, they’ve been able to share their stories with the masses.

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On Monday, former Penn State basketball player Rasir Bolton took to social media to explain that an alleged incident with coach Pat Chambers is the reason why he transferred to Iowa State. According to a report from ESPN, Chambers told Bolton, “I want to be a stress reliever for you. You can talk to me about anything. I need to get some of this pressure off you.”

“I want to loosen the noose that’s around your neck.”

The report goes on to say that Chambers never apologized to Bolton, and said that Bolton’s parents were “organized” and “well-spoken” during a meeting, which are microaggressions that mean, “I’m so shocked that Black people have their sh*t together and can speak so well.”

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Like clockwork, Chambers issued an apology, is still employed by the school, and claims he didn’t know that using a noose reference was that big of a deal.

And although this incident occurred before Bubba Wallace and NASCAR’s “noosegate,” it doesn’t erase the fact that the number of hangings have recently increased. Google “hangings in America” and just check out the dates on all the news stories that come up.

Chambers is lying about not knowing the implications of the word noose, or has convenient amnesia. Something white people tend to come down with quite often. Either way, he should be packing up his office.

But, this is Penn State. And we know the affinity they have for keeping problematic coaches employed.

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Also on Monday, came an allegation from former Michigan State All-American and NFL All-Pro, Andre Rison. In an interview with ESPN, Rison told a story of being slapped by assistant coach Carl “Buck” Nystrom, a white man, before a game during his sophomore year.

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“When the coach slapped me, the whole room got silent, and Mark Ingram Sr. put his arm around me,” Rison explained. “I shed a tear. I had never been struck by a grown man. Not by my grandfather, not by my father — who wasn’t in my life a lot — but I just had never been struck by any man, and then I had never been struck by a white man, for sure. For a long time, I just held it in.”

Last month, three football players at Liberty announced they were transferring due to “racial insensitivity” and “cultural incompetence.” There have also been multiple allegations against Clemson head coach Dabo Swinney and his love of the N-word, while Iowa head coach Kirk Ferentz has been under fire all summer for the racist allegations that have come forward about what he’s allowed to happen for more than 20 years under his tenure as head coach.

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Earlier this year, it was revealed that racism and use of the N-word by a member of the men’s basketball coaching staff at Wisconsin is what led star guard Kobe King to transfer.

The kids have had enough. Their patience for intolerance has expired.

And for all the athletic directors, board members, and college presidents that are trying to rectify these situations and uncertain how to handle their head coaches, the answer is simple.

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Fire them.

Saginaw Native. Morehouse Man. Syracuse (Newhouse) Alum. 2019 NABJ Award Winner. 2016 PABJ Journalist of the Year. I only eat my wings lemon-peppered. And I like brown liquor & brown women.

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