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Brett Favre is being sued for more than $16 million by Callais Capital Management for his role in marketing something called Sqor to eager investors. But what the hell is Sqor? It was a social media company in development, formed around the idea of helping athletes monetize their online selves. Callais contends that Favre and his business partners fraudulently misrepresented Sqor’s prospects in order to secure $16 million in investment funding. Per The Blast:

Despite representations that Sqor was expecting to raise up to $25 million through a round of equity capital, CCM says this was a lie. They claim the company provided a growth chart that “negligently and/or fraudulently misrepresented” their projected income for 2018 as $44 million.

Further, CCM claims that Sqor “materially misrepresented” they had over 325 million fans (users) and their social reach was over 350 million. They even claimed the Sqor “went so far as to misrepresent” their social media platform’s user growth metrics exceeded that of Twitter and LinkedIn.

I have an idea. Instead of giving millions of dollars to help create more social media, perhaps it would be better to just kick anyone who so much as utters aloud an idea for a new social media platform, right in the ass. Social media is hell.

Even compared to the sleazy shit going on on Twitter—some astronomical number of Twitter users are, in fact, bots created to swell the follower counts of “influencers”—it sounds like Sqor was largely a work of fiction:

CCM says that Sqor even lied about their ability to attract investor and they later learned the potential investors declined to put money into the company.

Favre allegedly received benefits from Sqor in the form of equity, athlete payments and private jet costs, among other things.

Sqor even claimed to CCM other athletes — like Conor McGregor, Rob Gronkowski, Odell Beckham Jr., Allen Iverson and others — were using the network and were bringing in millions of impressions. The suit says none of the athletes were actually using Sqor and the millions in impressions was a lie.

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Here’s a dipshit interview Farve gave about Sqor Sports back in 2015, before it dawned on him and his partners that you can talk about sports right there on goddamn Twitter and Facebook, without navigating to a whole other social media platform:

The lawsuit demands that Favre and his business partners return CCM’s initial investment, plus damages.