Here's an excerpt from the NBA rule book:

The game clock and shot clock must show :00.3 or more in order for a player to secure possession of the ball on a rebound or throw-in to attempt a field goal. Instant replay shall be utilized if the basket is successful on this type of play and the game clock runs to 0:00 or the shot clock expires on a made basket and the officials are not reasonably certain that the ball was released prior to the expiration of the shot clock. The only type of field goal which may be scored if the game clock and shot clock are at :00.2 or :00.1 is a “tip-in” or “high lob.”

The above rule is better known colloquially as the Trent Tucker Rule. In a 1990 game against the Bulls, the Knicks's Tucker caught an inbounds pass with 0.1 seconds left on the clock and rose to nail a game-winning three-pointer. The Bulls protested, arguing (correctly) that it was impossible to catch-and-shoot the ball within 0.1 seconds. They lost the protest, but the Trent Tucker Rule was soon adopted.

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But what makes the above basket from Trevor Booker last night even more amazing is the bolded part. The NBA rule book doesn't just specify that a player can't catch-and-shoot under 0.3 seconds, but that the only type of shot that can be made is a "tip-in" or a "high lob." That's what David Lee did for his 2006 game-winner with 0.1 seconds left. That's why Stan Van Gundy screamed at his team to "form a fucking wall" when playing defense with only 0.1 seconds left: if you prevent the tip-in around the hoop, you've prevented any chance of a made field goal.

Unless you're playing against Trevor Booker, that is, who can apparently perfectly execute a volleyball pass to knock the ball into the basket. I guess defenses will have to learn to do something more than just forming a fucking wall in the future.