Out Of Rehab, Michael Beasley Says He's Supercool Once More

Beasley just finished up a monthlong stint at a substance-abuse center in Houston and announced that he had moved on from weed, Twitter and adolescence in general. Whether any of those things actually constituted a problem, however, is still unclear.

Beasley spoke with reporters earlier today. You can read Ira Winderman's account, but to get a full sense of the awkwardness in the room, just check out the transcript:

Q. Since we're not really familiar, and with the limitations on comments we've received, can you tell us, when you went to Houston, originally, what was the plan there and then what changed about the plan?

A. "I feel like that's going into a little too much detail. I was in Houston for quite a while. Halfway through the process, I was told I was going to be there for a while longer, and I got kind of upset. That's pretty much what I want to say."

Q. The Twitter postings, the picture, and all that, what was that a result of? Because there were strong comments there that led to concerns from people?

A. "I would like to start off by saying I'm not suicidal. And I never, ever thought about killing myself or doing anything like that. Those Tweets were miscommunications that were misunderstood. I think I kind of channeled my emotions and threw my emotions the wrong way. That was the day I was told I was going to be at the facility for 30 more days, on top of the days I already did, and I was pretty upset. That's what the Tweets came from."

Q. Because it's the Internet, because everything is available to everyone, there is a picture posted and then removed, with your tattoo on the back, with wild assumptions, clearly some of that had to get back to you. Were you surprised the people inspected it almost as if it was Houston CSI and looking at that picture and seeing what they thought. What was your reaction to the reaction?

A. "I was surprised, because I was just there to get a tattoo. I didn't know what was in the picture. Had I have known, the picture wouldn't have gone up. I saw the picture. I tried to analyze the picture myself. I couldn't tell what was in it. To this day, I don't know what was in it. But it wasn't mine. That was just me not being aware of my surroundings. I have to get better than that and stop putting myself in vulnerable situations."

Q. Does Michael Beasley have a substance-abuse problem?

A. "No sir."

There was also the following exchange:

Q. If you can get into it, what was your daily schedule like?

A. (Shakes head, turns to team media-relations official, does not answer.)

Q. Can you give some perspective, people were trying to figure the type of setting you were in, whether it was a hospital setting, whether it was a comfortable social setting, something more stern. When Michael Beasley was in in-patient rehab, the term we've used now for the month, what was that like? Was it a single-dorm room, a comfortable setting, a tense setting, people have different visions. Was it frightening? Was it scary?

A. "It was like the Four Seasons."

Q. Was it that nice, seriously?

A. " Seriously."

Q. And did you feel comfortable in there?

A. (Shoulder shrug, no answer.)

Not long ago, Henry Abbott at TrueHoop made a noble run at explaining the situation. Why was Beasley really in rehab? There was hushed talk of guns and cars and women. It made him sound like Bugsy Siegel, when all outward indications, to that point, suggested that he was merely a magnificently talented, probably stoned 20-year-old flake whose only real crime was the NBA felony of producing bad PR. Sports people have always overreacted to flakes, and I'd like to think that's all that was going on here. Beasley certainly sounds the part:

Q. Your SuperCoolBeas tattoo on your back, what was the inspiration for that, the placement for that on your body. Can you background what happened there?

A. "Because I'm super cool. What inspires any tattoos? And I had an open space on my back."

To which one can only respond: (shoulder shrug.)

Michael Beasley insists he has no drug, depression issues, vows to mature [South Florida Sun-Sentinel]
Michael Beasley's summer odyssey: In his own words [South Florida Sun-Sentinel]