Image via Associated Press

Two more members of Baylor’s athletics department have been fired, USA Today reports tonight, citing an anonymous source. They are Colin Shillinglaw, the athletics director for football operations, and longtime athletics staffer Tom Hill. Both were fired last week.

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The report adds to the ongoing churn of people leaving Baylor following the university’s admission that it discouraged women from reporting sexual assault and made life hell for those who did, especially if it involved a football player. On Thursday, Baylor’s Board of Regents announced that football coach Art Briles was suspended indefinitely with the intent to fire him. They said that athletics director Ian McCaw had been sanctioned and placed on probation, but a few days later McCaw resigned. More people from the administration and athletics were being dismissed, the regents told reporters last week, but at the time they refused to give more specifics than that. Now from tonight’s USA Today report:

Shillinglaw was described by the person as someone who worked closely with Briles attending to player matters behind the scenes and had been linked to the accusations in the Pepper Hamilton report that led to the removal of Briles, the resignation of athletics director Ian McCaw and reassignment of president Ken Starr.

Hill had no formal responsibility within the football program, the person said, but had been at Baylor for 15 years in a variety of roles and was unofficially very involved with the football program.

According to Baylor’s athletics website, Shillinglaw came to Baylor with Briles from the University of Houston. Shillinglaw oversaw “every aspect of the Bears’ football program, including team travel, academics, departmental budget, personnel, gameday operations and serves as the liaison to BU’s senior athletic staff.” Hill is described as a “man who wears many hats” and his previous jobs included compliance director.

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Ken Starr (yes, that Ken Starr) was removed as president of Baylor but remains on as a tenured law professor and chancellor. His job duties include “religious liberty.”