Joonas Korpisalo Joins the Bittersweet Records Club: Here Are Some More Standout Performances in Losing Efforts

Joonas Korpisalo Joins the Bittersweet Records Club: Here Are Some More Standout Performances in Losing Efforts

Illustration for article titled Joonas Korpisalo Joins the Bittersweet Records Club: Here Are Some More Standout Performances in Losing Efforts
Photo: Getty

The Tampa Bay Lightning and Columbus Blue Jackets played the fourth-longest game in NHL history on Tuesday, taking five overtimes to complete the opener of their best-of-seven series in a marathon that finally ended when Brayden Point, found the puck on an open patch of ice and, on Tampa Bay’s 88th shot of the game, beat Joonas Korpisalo for a 3-2 final.

Korpisalo’s 85 saves in the game set a new NHL playoff record, shattering the previous mark of 73 stops by Kelly Hrudey in Game 7 of the 1987 Patrick Division semifinals. But while Hrudey can dine out on his Easter Epic performance on Long Island forever, as he led the Islanders to a 3-2 win over the Capitals, Korpisalo’s record carries the sting of defeat, as does Blue Jackets defenseman Seth Jones’ mark of 65:06 of ice time, the most since the NHL started tracking that stat in 1997.

Korpisalo and Jones do have some company in history, though, as other athletes have set records that became bittersweet memories because they happened in defeats…

Sorry to all the other Jesse Spectors for ruining your Google results.

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2 / 10

Michael Jordan

Michael Jordan



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April 20, 1986 was a momentous day in His Airness’ career, as Jordan set an NBA playoff record with 63 points at Boston Garden in Game 2 of the Bulls’ first-round series against the Celtics, pushing the eventual champions to double overtime.

The Bulls, of course, lost that game, because while they had Jordan, the Celtics had Larry Bird (36 points), Kevin McHale (27 points), and Danny Ainge (24 points), not to mention Dennis Johnson (15 points) and Robert Parish (13 points). Ainge is the only one of those Boston starters who isn’t a Hall of Famer, but the Celtics had Bill Walton off the bench for 10 points of his own.

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3 / 10

Tom Brady

Tom Brady



Illustration for article titled Joonas Korpisalo Joins the Bittersweet Records Club: Here Are Some More Standout Performances in Losing Efforts
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The future Hall of Fame is a four-time Super Bowl MVP, and holds a slew of records for the NFL’s biggest game that he can look back on happily, like his 43 completions in leading the Patriots’ comeback from a 25-point deficit against the Falcons in Super Bowl LI.

But Brady also set a record for passing yards in a Super Bowl with 505 against the Eagles in Super Bowl LII, which followed his record 16 consecutive completions against the Giants in Super Bowl XLVI. In each of those games, Brady attempted 48 passes without throwing an interception, also a record. And in each of those games, Brady and the Patriots lost.

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4 / 10

Tamika Catchings

Tamika Catchings

Illustration for article titled Joonas Korpisalo Joins the Bittersweet Records Club: Here Are Some More Standout Performances in Losing Efforts
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The game that Catchings had on July 3, 2002 is one of the weirdest performances in WNBA history. She was 6-for-6 on three-pointers, the most attempts from downtown in league history without a miss, but also 0-for-7 on two-point shots.

In this particular contest between Catchings’ Indiana Fever and the Orlando Miracle, her shooting kind of made sense, though. The two teams combined to shoot 18-for-47 (38.3%) on threes, but 34-for-90 (37.8%) on twos. The Miracle, with six players scoring in double figures, pulled out a 79-71 victory.

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5 / 10

Harvey Haddix

Harvey Haddix

Illustration for article titled Joonas Korpisalo Joins the Bittersweet Records Club: Here Are Some More Standout Performances in Losing Efforts
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On May 26, 1959, Haddix took the mound for the Pittsburgh Pirates in Milwaukee and started getting nothing but outs. Three up, three down in the first inning, three up, three down in the second, three up, three down in the third… and all the way through the ninth. Except, he didn’t have a perfect game because while the Pirates were getting runners on against Lew Burdette, they couldn’t score.

Burdette worked around a single in the 10th, Haddix tossed another perfect inning. Same in the 11th. Same in the 12th. And in the 13th, Burdette again worked around a single, but in the bottom of the inning, Don Hoak’s error let Felix Mantilla reach as Milwaukee’s first baserunner of the game. After Eddie Mathews’ sacrifice bunt, Haddix intentionally walked Hank Aaron… and then Joe Adcock hit what should have been a walkoff three-run homer, only the game ended 1-0 because Adcock passed Aaron (who didn’t realize the ball had cleared the fence) between second and third base, resulting in the play being ruled a walkoff double.

Either way, Haddix’s mark of retiring the first 36 batters of the game still stands, but that night at County Stadium, he took the loss.

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6 / 10

Bob Horner

Bob Horner

Illustration for article titled Joonas Korpisalo Joins the Bittersweet Records Club: Here Are Some More Standout Performances in Losing Efforts
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There have been 16 four-homer games in Major League Baseball history. Lou Gehrig was the first to do it, on June 3, 1932. J.D. Martinez was the most recent, on Sept. 4, 2017. But only Horner, on July 6, 1986, did it in a loss.

In Atlanta, Horner led off the second inning with a home run off Andy McGaffigan for the first run of the game. But Zane Smith couldn’t hold that lead, so when Horner took McGaffigan deep again in the fourth, it was to cut the Expos’ lead to 4-2. Montreal then broke the game open with a six-run fifth inning, so even though Horner’s three-run shot off McGaffigan in the bottom of that frame capped a five-run rally, it only made it 10-7. Horner popped out in the seventh inning, but got up again with two outs in the bottom of the ninth and made his history with a dinger off Jeff Reardon.

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7 / 10

Johnny Hekker

Johnny Hekker

Illustration for article titled Joonas Korpisalo Joins the Bittersweet Records Club: Here Are Some More Standout Performances in Losing Efforts
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There was a case to be made for Hekker to be the MVP of Super Bowl LIII if the Los Angeles Rams had been able to do, like, anything else in that game. Hekker punted nine times for an average of 46.3 yards, including a 65-yard boot that is the longest in Super Bowl history. His booming leg kept the Patriots in lousy field position all game long, and helped Los Angeles keep it a 3-3 game into the fourth quarter, when the Patriots finally found the end zone on their way to victory.

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8 / 10

Steve Christie

Steve Christie

Illustration for article titled Joonas Korpisalo Joins the Bittersweet Records Club: Here Are Some More Standout Performances in Losing Efforts
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When Christie kicked the longest field goal in Super Bowl history, a 54-yarder in the first quarter of Super Bowl XXVIII, it brought the Buffalo Bills into a 3-3 tie with the Dallas Cowboys. And Christie’s 28-yard boot at the end of the second quarter gave the Bills a 13-6 lead before The Judds took the stage for the halftime show.

Then Dallas scored 24 straight points in the second half. And somehow the next Super Bowl went even worse for the Bills.

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9 / 10

Bobby Lalonde

Bobby Lalonde

Illustration for article titled Joonas Korpisalo Joins the Bittersweet Records Club: Here Are Some More Standout Performances in Losing Efforts
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Bryan Trottier, Jari Kurri, Rod Brind’Amour, Jeremy Roenick, and Vincent Damphousse all had long and decorated NHL careers with plenty of achievements, including scoring two shorthanded goals in a single period in a playoff game. Lalonde did play a decade in the league, but the two shorties in a playoff period thing would be his most notable accomplishment… and of the six players to do it, he’s the only one who did it in a loss.

Not only that, the 6-3 loss that Lalonde and the Bruins suffered against the Minnesota North Stars wrapped up a three-game sweep in the preliminary round. Lalonde only played one more game in his NHL career.

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10 / 10

Sorry to all the other Jesse Spectors for ruining your Google results.