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On Monday, Michigan House Speaker Tom Leonard called for Simon’s resignation. “The best case scenario for Michigan State University is that there was absolutely gross negligence all the way to the top, and worst case scenario, something’s being covered up,” Leonard said.

When asked for comment about the demand for Simon’s resignation, MSU spokesman Jason Cody referred me to the statement released by the board of trustees in response to last week’s editorial in the Lansing State Journal. “Our full confidence in President Lou Anna K. Simon has not wavered. We firmly believe she is the right leader for this university,” the trustees wrote. (You can read the full statement here.)

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In response to the increased public and political pressure, MSU instructed Fitzgerald to assist Schuette. Fitzgerald, for his part, wrote a letter explaining that there was, in fact, no existing report to make public. “As to the demands by the plaintiffs’ counsel to produce an ‘investigative report,’ MSU cannot produce an investigative report for a simple reason: as has been stated publicly before, there is no investigative report,” he wrote. Fitzgerald said that if the lawyers had come across any evidence that would’ve implicated anyone on MSU’s staff in criminal conduct, they would’ve turned that information over to law enforcement.

MSU’s response to the Nassar sexual abuse scandal has been poorly handled, even by the standards of another university widely thought to have poorly handled its own child sexual molestation scandal. If an institution in the middle of a sexual abuse scandal does not want to be compared to the Catholic church, they also don’t want to be compared to Penn State.

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Penn State, unlike MSU, made their investigation into how they mishandled allegations of sexual abuse against Jerry Sandusky available almost immediately to the public after the board trustees had a chance to see it. The Freeh Report did not make Penn State look good, to say the very least, and major figures at Penn State were forced to resign or were fired in the wake of the Sandusky molestation scandal, including legendary football coach Joe Paterno and university president Graham Spanier. Spanier and two others at Penn State faced criminal charges and were sentenced to prison.

Denhollander was among those who noticed that Michigan State, at least so far, has not lived up even to that standard. Penn State had previously been viewed as the poster child of how not to address a child molestation crisis at your institution, Denhollander pointed out after Nassar’s sentencing. She said, “MSU has eclipsed them by a long shot.”

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Update: On Thursday afternoon, the Lansing State Journal’s R.J. Wolcott reported that Dr. William Strampel was stepping down from his position as dean of Michigan State’s College of Osteopathic Medicine, effective immediately. He was placed on medical leave, but will remain on Michigan State’s faculty.