Who knew these athletes had such second careers

Who knew these athletes had such second careers

Kevin Dyson went from receiver passing to receiving grades.
Kevin Dyson went from receiver passing to receiving grades.
Image: (Getty Images)

When most professional athletes retire from sports, it’s almost a lock that they will go into something else in the world of athletics, most often media. Their expertise is used as commentators, analysts, and sometimes hosts. A match made in heaven, right?

However, in Kevin Dyson’s case, he has fulfilled a major need in American society. The former Tennessee Titans receiver — most known for scoring the winning touchdown in the Music City Miracle or coming up one yard shy in Super Bowl XXXIV — went into education, becoming a middle school principal.

According to a 2011-2012 United States Department of Education study, roughly only 10 percent of public school principals are Black.

Dyson became a high school assistant principal in 2010. Since then he has served as an interim principal and is now permanently installed as the principal for Grassland Middle School in Tennessee.

Here’s a few other professional athletes that have gone on to non-traditional post-playing careers:

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Brian Orakpo and Michael Griffin

Brian Orakpo and Michael Griffin

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Image: Getty Images

Orakpo, a four-time Pro Bowl outside linebacker who retired from the NFL in 2018 is the co-owner of a Texas-based cupcake store, Gigi’s Cupcakes in Austin, Texas. He owns the store with his former Titans teammate Michael Griffin.

Griffin is a second-team all-pro safety. He retired in 2016.

Orakpo is also the co-owner of a training app, Athlete Connect, which connects people to trainers in their area. He also owns an online gaming facility, 5-Star Esports Arena, in Austin, Texas.

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Myron Rolle

Myron Rolle

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Image: Getty Images

The Rhodes Scholar spent two seasons in the NFL, retiring in 2013. He entered medical school that same year and is currently finishing up his residency as Global Neurosurgery Fellow at Harvard Medical School.

You may have caught Rolle on CNN a few times discussing the impact of the coronavirus.

According to the Association of American Medical colleges, less than 5 percent of doctors in the United States are Black. And roughly 47 percent of Black doctors are Black men.

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Randy Johnson

Randy Johnson

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Image: Getty Images

The Big Unit is a Hall of Famer with five Cy Youngs in his closet, but now instead of throwing at guys’ heads, he’s more likely to be taking headshots.

Johnson is now a full-time photographer founding Randy Johnson Photography in 2015. He has photographed numerous NFL games, concerts, and special events.

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Mark Hamilton

Mark Hamilton

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Image: Getty Images

Hamilton spent one season with the St. Louis Cardinals, winning a World Series in 2011. He later went on to medical school. He is currently wrapping up his residency in Internal Medicine and Interventional Radiology at Northwell Health in New York City.

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Ken Griffey Jr.

Ken Griffey Jr.

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You probably know Junior as a 10-time Gold Glove winner and MLB Hall of Famer, but like former teammate Randy Johnson, the The Kid turned his hobby of photography into a second career. Junior has shot numerous college football games, Monday Night Football, and professional racing.

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Nate Hughes

Nate Hughes

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Image: Getty Images

Hughes’ four-year NFL career ended in 2012.

Hughes graduated from the University of Mississippi Medical School and is currently working on his anesthesiology residency at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, NJ.

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LaRue Martin

LaRue Martin

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Image: Getty Images

Martin was the first pick in the 1972 NBA Draft. He was one of the best big men of his era and spent all four of his NBA seasons with the Portland Trail Blazers.

In 1987, Martin joined The United States Postal Service as a delivery driver and rose in the ranks.

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Vinnie Johnson

Vinnie Johnson

Illustration for article titled Who knew these athletes had such second careers
Image: (Getty Images)

Johnson is a two-time NBA Champion and is most known for his time with the “Bad Boy” Detroit Pistons.

“The Microwave” retired in 1992, beginning his manufacturing company Piston Group in 1995. The company is based in Michigan and is a leading Value Added Assembly company.

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Jeremy Towns

Jeremy Towns

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Image: Getty Images

Towns (above r.) spent two seasons in the NFL, retiring in 2015. He went to medical school at the University of South Alabama and is working on his residency in Emergency Medicine at the University of Alabama-Birmingham.

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Alan Page

Alan Page

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Image: Getty Images

Once a member of the Minnesota Vikings’ feared Purple People Eaters of the 1970s, the NFL Hall of Fame lineman attended law school while he was a player, and became a judge not long after his playing days ended. Page, however, ended up on a different team’s bench in 1993 — that of the Minnesota Supreme Court, where he sat until his retirement in 2015.

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