Photo: Jonathan Ferrey (Getty)

It stinks when a team up late in the game can milk the clock for the better part of a minute just because they snag an offensive rebound and cache the ball deep in the backcourt. The NBA’s newly announced shot clock rule should cut down on that idling, and force more actual basketball plays to occur:

Shot Clock Reset – The shot clock will reset to 14 seconds in three scenarios: after an offensive rebound of a missed field goal or free throw that hit the rim; after a loose ball foul is called on the defensive team immediately following a missed field goal or free throw that hit the rim; or after the offensive team gets possession of the ball after it goes out of bounds immediately following a missed field goal or free throw that hit the rim.

It stinks when a player in transition sees a beautiful expanse of open court. only to get tangled up in some cheap foul by a defender who had no chance of getting in front of the play. The NBA’s newly streamlined clear path rule should allow for more disrespectful breakaway dunks and, possibly, also more good-faith chasedowns:

Simplification of the Clear Path Foul Rule – The changes to the clear path foul rule establish “bright line” standards based on the position of players at the time of the foul while also narrowing required referee judgment and reducing the number of variables impacting the rule’s application.

I don’t really care one way or another about “hostile acts,” but I generally want fewer triggers for instant replay review, so I suppose this one stinks.

Expanded Definition of “Hostile Act” for Replay Purposes – For purposes of triggering instant replay review, the definition of a “hostile act” has been broadened to enable referees to determine the appropriate penalty for players or coaches if they are involved in hostile encounters with each other, referees or fans.

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On balance, though, less stink. Good job, everyone.