Facebook Makes It Easier, And More Difficult, To Cheat In College

We are still somewhat new to the world of Facebook — and we really, really don't want to Facebook chat, and we'd rather not the world know that we bought two tickets to Baby Mama — but if we had access to it when we were in college, we suspect we would have had a different experience. We definitely would have gone to class less. That said, we're not an athlete, and we don't have to hide anything.

Andy Robinson, the leading scorer for the University of Buffalo, was recently assigned a report on There Are No Children Here. Because reading is for suckers, he asked for some help on Facebook.

"I am paying anybody who have read the book "there are no children here' by Alex Kotlowitz $30-40 which in some classes you have to read at UB (even more money if you have to read the book a little more!!) to write a 3-4 page paper, on a couple questions which was assigned."

We love the idea that he's willing to pay more for someone who is willing to glance over the book again, rather than just opine from some vague memory. Robinson was caught, because Facebook can actually be seen by other people, and he's now unable to participate in offseason workouts in lieu of further punishment down the line.

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Oh, and all you get is $30-40 for writing papers anymore? That seems awfully cheap. Come on, Andy, you're a college athlete! Bust out the checkbook already.

College Athletes Now Using Facebook To Try And Get Others To Do Their Homework For Them [FanIQ]