Introducing The Grantland Comments And Corrections Desk

As a public service, Deadspin will be supplying ESPN's Grantland with a forum for corrections, clarifications, and reader comments till the startup has a chance to produce its own. Readers who have corrections or comments for Grantland can send them to tips@deadspin.com, subject line "Dear Grantland."

Correction: In Editor in Chief Bill Simmons's "Welcome to Grantland" introductory column, a sidenote misspelled the name of Barret Robbins as "Barrett Robbins." The error has been corrected by rewrite, without acknowledgment.

Correction: In his column on how DVR technology affects sports-watching, Chuck Klosterman referred to "Monica Seles getting stabbed at the French Open." Seles was stabbed during the Citizens Cup in Hamburg, Germany. The error has been corrected and acknowledged with strikethrough.

Clarification: In writing that The Decision was "one of the best things that ever happened to the NBA," Editor in Chief Bill Simmons cited the TV ratings for the NBA Finals:

2010-11: 10.6 and 11.0 (estimated) for the pre-Decision and post-Decision seasons, a 32 percent jump from the 2009 Finals (8.4) and a 75 percent jump from the 2007 Finals (6.2).

The ratings before and after The Decision are near equal; these figures suggest that whatever caused a jump in ratings happened between 2009 and 2010, while LeBron James was still with the Cleveland Cavaliers.

Correction: In his column on being a bandwagon NHL fan, Editor in Chief Bill Simmons wrote that after the Vancouver Canucks lost game seven of the 1994 finals to the New York Rangers, "No Canadian team has come that close again." The Calgary Flames and Edmonton Oilers both lost game sevens after the Canucks did. The sentence was corrected by rewrite, with no acknowledgment.

In the same column, Simmons wrote about being in the background of a photo of "Patrick Beverley's first goal." The name of the player in the photo is Rich Peverley. The sentence was corrected by rewrite, with no acknowledgment.

Correction: In his column on the Boston Bruins winning the Stanley Cup, Editor in Chief Bill Simmons wrote that the "first sporting event I remember watching" was "Game 7 of the 1974 Stanley Cup finals." The Boston Bruins lost the 1974 Cup in six games*. That and two other references to a 1974 Game 7** have been rewritten to correct the error; after they were rewritten, an acknowledgment was added.

[*, ** — Sentences rewritten to correct the incorrect correction we made. Don't ask. So meta.]

Simmons also wrote that Boston threw a parade for Ray Bourque when he won the Cup with the Colorado Avalanche in 1999. In 1999, Bourque was still with the Bruins, and the Dallas Stars won the Stanley Cup. Colorado's victory and Bourque's parade happened in 2001. The sentence was rewritten to correct the error, with no acknowledgment.

Correction: In the first sentence of his introductory column about A.L. East baseball, Chris Jones wrote, "Without looking it up, I can tell you the night the Toronto Blue Jays won their first World Series—October 27, 1992—because that was also the night I lost my virginity." The Blue Jays won their first World Series on October 24, 1992. The error has been corrected by rewrite, with no acknowledgment.

Correction: In his Father's Day column, Jimmy Kimmel wrote "I was at the Final Four in Seattle when Tyus Edney of UCLA raced the length of the court, dribbling behind his back to bank a shot that beat Missouri by a point." Edney's game-winner against Missouri happened in the second round, at Boise. The error has been corrected by rewrite, without acknowledgment.

Kimmel also wrote "I saw a 37-year-old Magic Johnson score a near-triple-double in his first game back after retiring because of HIV." Johnson was 36 at the time. The error has not yet been corrected.

Correction: In his column about Zach Britton and the Baltimore Orioles, Chris Jones wrote "There have been a grand total of six playoff games at Camden Yards; the Orioles have lost five of them." There have been 10 playoff games at Camden Yards, and the Orioles have gone 4-6 there in the postseason. The error has been corrected by rewrite, with no acknowledgment.

In the same column, Jones described members of the 1999 Orioles clubhouse: "Cal Ripken's blue eyes had turned jet black by then, his shoulders sagging under the unbearable weight of The Streak." Ripken's consecutive-games streak had ended the season before, on September 20, 1998. The sentence has been rewritten to say "still sagging," with no acknowledgment of error.

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