This Week In Unintentional Dong Submissions

You people see dongs everywhere, don't you?

Like Caleb G. here. He got this from a friend of a friend in Las Vegas. "Apparently," he writes, "a one-gallon can of creamy white paint fell and created this phallic masterpiece, complete with happy ending. His fiance used to work at Sherwin Williams, and her old co-worker sent this."

This Week In Unintentional Dong Submissions

M.J.H. declares "God is a funny mother fucker" because of this dong-emblazoned pony.

This Week In Unintentional Dong Submissions

Ryan G.'s dong submission came correct with a romantic vignette: "So I went on a date last night and as we're getting up to leave, I stop and point out this amazing divination on the table made from our beer. We looked back at each other and we both knew, it's on." Thankfully, he stopped there.

This Week In Unintentional Dong Submissions

Cam and Harrison caught this telestrator dong during the Pittsburgh/LA game.

This Week In Unintentional Dong Submissions

Chris "got this little guy at a Panda Express."

This Week In Unintentional Dong Submissions

Tipster Kevin C. took the time to capture "pumpkin rot dong" for all to see. We couldn't be more proud of Kevin C. If you know Kevin C., let him know how much he's appreciated.

This Week In Unintentional Dong Submissions

BN saw Cloud Dong during the Notre Dame vs. Navy game.

This Week In Unintentional Dong Submissions

Susan R. saw this "GAP WOMENS OLIVE GREEN CASHMERE BLEND SWEATER WRAP CARDIGAN EUC M" on eBay. Then It placed the lotion in the basket.

This Week In Unintentional Dong Submissions

A friend of Miles's "announced this week that she is pregnant and I was pleasantly surprised at the ultrasound picture she posted to Facebook." Pleasantly surprised because the fetus looks like a womb dong.

This Week In Unintentional Dong Submissions

Ron D. hereby presents Cashew Dong.

This Week In Unintentional Dong Submissions

I'm just going to let Jim A. explain this one:

Received the Bits and Pieces catalog in the mail, the other day. This item was on the cover.
Invented in the 19th century by Admiral FitzRoy, the famous sailor and meteorologist, this amazing and mysterious liquid and crystal filled storm glass device is used for predicting the weather up to 2 days in advance.
You'll see changes in the crystal formations if it will be fair weather (clear liquid), rainy weather (murky liquid), thunderstorms (crystals at the top), cloudy skies with snow (large flaky crystals) and even windy weather (threads of crystals). A wonderfully simple antique reproduction with an elegant wooden base. Measures 6½" tall.