At a certain point, arrogance should give way to humility. Watching the video above, it must happen slower when you're a legendary coach and king of a small basketball-crazed community.

Syracuse is under investigation again and all Boeheim can muster is to point out the "again" part, as if that somehow undercuts everything while also managing to ignore that this time it is about more than just Fab Melo. The NCAA is a sham mostly and when it goes after programs for bogus eligibility violations to further the fiction that is amateur athletics we all roll our eyes, but when it comes to programs running amok on campus, we've learned to listen.

According to CBS Sports, the investigation is a wide-ranging one, covering several years and various infractions, including how the school handled 2007 allegations of sexual assault by Jonny Flynn, Scoop Jardine and Rick Jackson.

[T]he university's judicial board found that three players and one other student were not guilty of sexual assault but that they were responsible for conduct "that threatened the mental health" of the female student, according to The Post-Standard's archives.

They were placed on disciplinary probation through the spring 2011 semester, ordered to perform 30 hours of community service, to attend gender-sensitivity and domestic violence educational programs and to be evaluated to determine if they need any further counseling, the archives said.

An NCAA investigator, Meg Babcock Locker, has been handling the case and conducted interviews with various Syracuse officials regarding the 2007 sexual assault accusation, including former associate Dean David Potter who also reccommended she interview former dean Cathryn Newton. According to the Post-Standard, Newton would not confirm whether she was interviewed by Locker, but she did offer this:

“An arts and sciences student filed a complaint that was specific and credible, and that complaint did not progress in the usual way.”

The Post-Standard goes on to let a former compliance officer, David Ridpath, speculate on the effect of "administrative involvement in judicial affairs"—an Onandonga County grand jury dismissed the claims in 2007—would have on the NCAA's investigation. Typically there is a four year statute of limitations for NCAA violations, except in the case of “gross, willful and wanton disregard for the rules.” Obviously, influencing the judicial process would fit the bill.

At this point, Syracuse and Boeheim have been dodging a lot of bullets. Even if all these issues are resolved in a palatable manner for the program (Fab Melo suspended; Flynn, Jardine and Jackson put on probation, and ordered to attend counseling in domestic violence) they are still issues that need resolving. Boeheim seems to scoff and point to his and his program's continued presence as some sort of trump card because they are still present.

He's 68 years old; a living legend leaving for a strange new conference next year with not much left to prove to anyone. It's almost as if he's no longer pissed because he thinks his program is being picked on, he's pissed he won't be able to walk away on his own terms. The thing a bully hates most is the appearance of weakness. Even if he was going to step down in the near future voluntarily, it's going to look like he was pushed out and that's got to be eating him up inside.

Sources: Syracuse basketball program under wide-ranging NCAA investigation [Syracuse.com]

Syracuse hoops under investigation [CBS]